I received the edited first half of Moonburner from my publisher this weekend. It’s starting to look like a real book!

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Here it is all laid out on my computer screen!

Now it’s my turn to spend some quality time with my Chicago Manual of Style and make sure the text is perfect.

In the meantime, the cover design and marketing efforts are moving forward. Today before I dove into editing, I spent some time thinking about my Back Cover Blurb.

If a book’s cover design is the first chance to snag a reader’s attention, the back blurb is the second (and last) shot. But what makes a blurb great? According to Jane Friedman’s blog, for fiction, the blurb should succinctly present the high-level narrative of the story. It should start with your compelling hook, include the most engaging plot points, and preferably leave a teaser to pique the reader’s interest. See some examples here.

To come up with my blurb, I pared down some marketing copy I had already created, with a special eye for the most important plot points of the story. (1) The inciting incident: Kai being exposed as a moonburner and sentenced to death; (2) Journey from the known: Escaping from Kita to the moonburner citadel in Miina; (3) Midpoint or second crisis: learning that the citadel leadership is up to something fishy; (4) Vague reference to the climax (no spoilers here!): Kai battling the citadel forces with the help of her unexpected knowledge and allies.

Here is what I came up with for Moonburner:

When 17-year old Kai is exposed as a female sorceress—a moonburner, she knows the punishment is death. Despite the odds against her, Kai escapes her fate and undertakes a harrowing journey to a land where moonburners are revered and trained as warriors.

But the moonburner citadel is not the place of refuge and learning that Kai imagined. The ongoing war against the male sorcerers has led the citadel leadership down a dark path that could spell the end of all magic. Armed with a secret from her past and a treasonous ally, Kai may be the only person able to prevent the destruction of her people.

I can’t quite get the last sentence right, but overall, I like it. What do you think?


Featured image by Lorenzo Scheda, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/